Daylight simulation

For luminaire to achieve full effect it has to be able to supplant daylight not just in illumination of a given space, but in all of its biological purposes as well. Dynamic lighting systems are especially effective in delivering the desired effects. The better the system is at replicating the various aspects and effects of natural light, in stimulating the circadian ganglion cells, the higher it should rank in the emotion aspect. In spaces with access to natural light the artificial system should play a secondary role: helping to illuminate room in the mornings and evenings or improve lighting conditions in overcast weather or short winter days. To prevent sudden changes in illumination levels the switch between natural and artificial light should be gradual, giving the eye enough time to adjust to the new conditions. Such use of daylight is also energy efficient.

 

The reaction of the body to the blue light content and other properties of natural light is all a matter of evolution – the artificial lighting has become a reality only 120 years ago with Edison and his incandescent light. Until then, the organisms have been adjusting themselves to the natural light coming directly from above and have organized their daily activities according to the availability of daylight. The discovery of cells affecting melatonin production has made a significant breakthrough in understanding the role of lighting in human well-being.

Further research even proposed the metric to evaluate melatonin suppression by different light sources, enabling quantitative assessment of different lighting solutions on human behaviour and well-being (Dietrich Gall: Die Messung Circadianer Strahlungsgrössen, Technische Universität Illmenau, 2004). These discoveries have been judged as a new paradigm for lighting systems and their effect on human health by scientist Marc Rea.

For luminaire to achieve full effect it has to be able to supplant daylight not just in illumination of a given space, but in all of its biological purposes as well. Dynamic lighting systems are especially effective in delivering the desired effects. The better the system is at replicating the various aspects and effects of natural light, in stimulating the circadian ganglion cells, the higher it should rank in the emotion aspect.

In spaces with access to natural light the artificial system should play a secondary role: helping to illuminate room in the mornings and evenings or improve lighting conditions in overcast weather or short winter days. The daylight sensors can provide dynamic information about the amount of daylight hitting important areas – such as working surfaces – and in case of insufficient daylight the artificial light should take care of the situation. To prevent sudden changes in illumination levels the switch between natural and artificial light could be gradual, giving the eye enough time to adjust to the new conditions. Such use of daylight is also energy efficient.

In spaces with limited or no direct access to natural lighting extreme care has to be taken to replicate the daylight conditions to the largest extent. This may mean combining different light sources in the luminaires and using digital control of illumination e.g. via pre-programmed scenes for different seasons or times of day. Only in these conditions the long-term comfort for humans can be achieved. Otherwise adverse health effects may occur, from immune problems to depression to insomnia. The evolution still hasn’t caught up with the rapid changes in the artificial lighting; therefore new lighting technologies should come to aid to provide the necessary human well-being even in unnatural lighting conditions.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this pageShare on TumblrShare on VKPin on PinterestShare on Reddit